I Love Film Shooting

Digital photography has been around now since the late 1990s.  I remember when I got my first digital camera which was some kind of an Olympus camera that had 1.1 megapixels.  It was clunky and kind of looked like the film cameras of the time such as the Vivitar that my Dad lugged around.  Nonetheless, it was a technology marvel for the time because it didn’t require costly film.

After that, I moved into SLR digital photography with the first Canon Digital Rebel in 2004.  That camera was amazing and I created so many great photographs with it.  After the Digital Rebel, I went with the Canon 30D and really haven’t changed my digital SLR since then (I know, I’m super behind).

In 2006, I got into shooting with a film camera.  I was one of those rare cases that got their start doing digital and then later decided to try film.  My film camera was a Voigtlander Bessa and it was great, except for when you hit the shutter button and it made a very loud sound.  That became a bit challenging doing the work that I did taking candid street photography.  I sold that camera and decided to just stay with modern times and shoot digital.

That was a bit of a mistake.  When I looked back at my film shots, I couldn’t help but like them more than my digital shots, especially when it came to street photography.  So, I decided I would explore film one more time and this time I wouldn’t mess around.  I went for a used Leica M6 with a cloth shutter so the shutter wasn’t so noisy and a Voigtlander 28mm lens.

I’ve had this camera ever since and I continue to shoot with it whenever I get the chance.  The downfall is the time it takes to develop my film and then scan it in.  Once its scanned in though, it usually doesn’t need a lot of tweaks to give it that cool effect like digital often does.  I also love manual shooting.  I feel more in control of my photos especially when it comes to snapping the shutter.  I get no lag at all with film because their is no autofocus or the computer deciding what the best exposure is.  I do that even before I take the shot.  It’s just push the button and bang!  You could do this with digital, but its difficult to do on modern cameras.  Most of them assume you won’t be doing this and haven’t made it easy.

I love the grain, I love the black and white tones, I love the scratches.  I usually use Kodak Tri-X 400 or Kodak T-Max 100 for film.  To me — film is the way photographs should be and they make photography truly an art.  It feels crafty developing the film in a tank of chemicals and cutting the film with a scissor to get it on the scanner.  You just don’t get that with digital.  Digital is surely faster, but this is a hobby for me, not a career.

If you have never explored film, just go out and give it a try even with an inexpensive camera like a Ricoh GR.  Film is like vinyl.  It’s for those who don’t mind investing the time and money to get what they believe is truly the best. I Love Film Shooting

Digital photography has been around now since the late 1990s.  I remember when I got my first digital camera which was some kind of an Olympus camera that had 1.1 megapixels.  It was clunky and kind of looked like the film cameras of the time such as the Vivitar that my Dad lugged around.  Nonetheless, it was a technology marvel for the time because it didn’t require costly film.

After that, I moved into SLR digital photography with the first Canon Digital Rebel in 2004.  That camera was amazing and I created so many great photographs with it.  After the Digital Rebel, I went with the Canon 30D and really haven’t changed my digital SLR since then (I know, I’m super behind).

In 2006, I got into shooting with a film camera.  I was one of those rare cases that got their start doing digital and then later decided to try film.  My film camera was a Voigtlander Bessa and it was great, except for when you hit the shutter button and it made a very loud sound.  That became a bit challenging doing the work that I did taking candid street photography.  I sold that camera and decided to just stay with modern times and shoot digital.

That was a bit of a mistake.  When I looked back at my film shots, I couldn’t help but like them more than my digital shots, especially when it came to street photography.  So, I decided I would explore film one more time and this time I wouldn’t mess around.  I went for a used Leica M6 with a cloth shutter so the shutter wasn’t so noisy and a Voigtlander 28mm lens.

I’ve had this camera ever since and I continue to shoot with it whenever I get the chance.  The downfall is the time it takes to develop my film and then scan it in.  Once its scanned in though, it usually doesn’t need a lot of tweaks to give it that cool effect like digital often does.  I also love manual shooting.  I feel more in control of my photos especially when it comes to snapping the shutter.  I get no lag at all with film because their is no autofocus or the computer deciding what the best exposure is.  I do that even before I take the shot.  It’s just push the button and bang!  You could do this with digital, but its difficult to do on modern cameras.  Most of them assume you won’t be doing this and haven’t made it easy.

I love the grain, I love the black and white tones, I love the scratches.  I usually use Kodak Tri-X 400 or Kodak T-Max 100 for film.  To me — film is the way photographs should be and they make photography truly an art.  It feels crafty developing the film in a tank of chemicals and cutting the film with a scissor to get it on the scanner.  You just don’t get that with digital.  Digital is surely faster, but this is a hobby for me, not a career.

If you have never explored film, just go out and give it a try even with an inexpensive camera like a Ricoh GR.  Film is like vinyl.  It’s for those who don’t mind investing the time and money to get what they believe is truly the best. I Love Film Shooting

Digital photography has been around now since the late 1990s.  I remember when I got my first digital camera which was some kind of an Olympus camera that had 1.1 megapixels.  It was clunky and kind of looked like the film cameras of the time such as the Vivitar that my Dad lugged around.  Nonetheless, it was a technology marvel for the time because it didn’t require costly film.

After that, I moved into SLR digital photography with the first Canon Digital Rebel in 2004.  That camera was amazing and I created so many great photographs with it.  After the Digital Rebel, I went with the Canon 30D and really haven’t changed my digital SLR since then (I know, I’m super behind).

In 2006, I got into shooting with a film camera.  I was one of those rare cases that got their start doing digital and then later decided to try film.  My film camera was a Voigtlander Bessa and it was great, except for when you hit the shutter button and it made a very loud sound.  That became a bit challenging doing the work that I did taking candid street photography.  I sold that camera and decided to just stay with modern times and shoot digital.

That was a bit of a mistake.  When I looked back at my film shots, I couldn’t help but like them more than my digital shots, especially when it came to street photography.  So, I decided I would explore film one more time and this time I wouldn’t mess around.  I went for a used Leica M6 with a cloth shutter so the shutter wasn’t so noisy and a Voigtlander 28mm lens.

I’ve had this camera ever since and I continue to shoot with it whenever I get the chance.  The downfall is the time it takes to develop my film and then scan it in.  Once its scanned in though, it usually doesn’t need a lot of tweaks to give it that cool effect like digital often does.  I also love manual shooting.  I feel more in control of my photos especially when it comes to snapping the shutter.  I get no lag at all with film because their is no autofocus or the computer deciding what the best exposure is.  I do that even before I take the shot.  It’s just push the button and bang!  You could do this with digital, but its difficult to do on modern cameras.  Most of them assume you won’t be doing this and haven’t made it easy.

I love the grain, I love the black and white tones, I love the scratches.  I usually use Kodak Tri-X 400 or Kodak T-Max 100 for film.  To me — film is the way photographs should be and they make photography truly an art.  It feels crafty developing the film in a tank of chemicals and cutting the film with a scissor to get it on the scanner.  You just don’t get that with digital.  Digital is surely faster, but this is a hobby for me, not a career.

If you have never explored film, just go out and give it a try even with an inexpensive camera like a Ricoh GR.  Film is like vinyl.  It’s for those who don’t mind investing the time and money to get what they believe is truly the best. I Love Film Shooting

Digital photography has been around now since the late 1990s.  I remember when I got my first digital camera which was some kind of an Olympus camera that had 1.1 megapixels.  It was clunky and kind of looked like the film cameras of the time such as the Vivitar that my Dad lugged around.  Nonetheless, it was a technology marvel for the time because it didn’t require costly film.

After that, I moved into SLR digital photography with the first Canon Digital Rebel in 2004.  That camera was amazing and I created so many great photographs with it.  After the Digital Rebel, I went with the Canon 30D and really haven’t changed my digital SLR since then (I know, I’m super behind).

In 2006, I got into shooting with a film camera.  I was one of those rare cases that got their start doing digital and then later decided to try film.  My film camera was a Voigtlander Bessa and it was great, except for when you hit the shutter button and it made a very loud sound.  That became a bit challenging doing the work that I did taking candid street photography.  I sold that camera and decided to just stay with modern times and shoot digital.

That was a bit of a mistake.  When I looked back at my film shots, I couldn’t help but like them more than my digital shots, especially when it came to street photography.  So, I decided I would explore film one more time and this time I wouldn’t mess around.  I went for a used Leica M6 with a cloth shutter so the shutter wasn’t so noisy and a Voigtlander 28mm lens.

I’ve had this camera ever since and I continue to shoot with it whenever I get the chance.  The downfall is the time it takes to develop my film and then scan it in.  Once its scanned in though, it usually doesn’t need a lot of tweaks to give it that cool effect like digital often does.  I also love manual shooting.  I feel more in control of my photos especially when it comes to snapping the shutter.  I get no lag at all with film because their is no autofocus or the computer deciding what the best exposure is.  I do that even before I take the shot.  It’s just push the button and bang!  You could do this with digital, but its difficult to do on modern cameras.  Most of them assume you won’t be doing this and haven’t made it easy.

I love the grain, I love the black and white tones, I love the scratches.  I usually use Kodak Tri-X 400 or Kodak T-Max 100 for film.  To me — film is the way photographs should be and they make photography truly an art.  It feels crafty developing the film in a tank of chemicals and cutting the film with a scissor to get it on the scanner.  You just don’t get that with digital.  Digital is surely faster, but this is a hobby for me, not a career.

If you have never explored film, just go out and give it a try even with an inexpensive camera like a Ricoh GR.  Film is like vinyl.  It’s for those who don’t mind investing the time and money to get what they believe is truly the best.

I Love Film Shooting

Digital photography has been around now since the late 1990s. I remember when I got my first digital camera which was some kind of an Olympus camera that had 1.1 megapixels. It was clunky and kind of looked like the film cameras of the time such as the Vivitar that my Dad lugged around. Nonetheless, it was a technology marvel for the time because it didn’t require costly film.

After that, I moved into SLR digital photography with the first Canon Digital Rebel in 2004. That camera was amazing and I created so many great photographs with it. After the Digital Rebel, I went with the Canon 30D and really haven’t changed my digital SLR since then (I know, I’m super behind).

In 2006, I got into shooting with a film camera. I was one of those rare cases that got their start doing digital and then later decided to try film. My film camera was a Voigtlander Bessa and it was great, except for when you hit the shutter button and it made a very loud sound. That became a bit challenging doing the work that I did taking candid street photography. I sold that camera and decided to just stay with modern times and shoot digital.

That was a bit of a mistake. When I looked back at my film shots, I couldn’t help but like them more than my digital shots, especially when it came to street photography. So, I decided I would explore film one more time and this time I wouldn’t mess around. I went for a used Leica M6 with a cloth shutter so the shutter wasn’t so noisy and a Voigtlander 28mm lens.

I’ve had this camera ever since and I continue to shoot with it whenever I get the chance. The downfall is the time it takes to develop my film and then scan it in. Once its scanned in though, it usually doesn’t need a lot of tweaks to give it that cool effect like digital often does. I also love manual shooting. I feel more in control of my photos especially when it comes to snapping the shutter. I get no lag at all with film because their is no autofocus or the computer deciding what the best exposure is. I do that even before I take the shot. It’s just push the button and bang! You could do this with digital, but its difficult to do on modern cameras. Most of them assume you won’t be doing this and haven’t made it easy.

I love the grain, I love the black and white tones, I love the scratches. I usually use Kodak Tri-X 400 or Kodak T-Max 100 for film. To me — film is the way photographs should be and they make photography truly an art. It feels crafty developing the film in a tank of chemicals and cutting the film with a scissor to get it on the scanner. You just don’t get that with digital. Digital is surely faster, but this is a hobby for me, not a career.

If you have never explored film, just go out and give it a try even with an inexpensive camera like a Ricoh GR. Film is like vinyl. It’s for those who don’t mind investing the time and money to get what they believe is truly the best.

Notebooks for Mac and iOS

Notebooks for iOS is a full fledged notebook offering plain text, rich text, drawings, and PDF storage. Like Evernote, it allows you to store quite a bit of information and easily sync it with the cloud (Dropbox). Unlike Evernote, its not nearly as robust in its features. I use it for plain text and markdown notes only and it seems excel at this. I’ll stick with Evernote for everything else.

[[MORE]]

I’ve seen Notebooks 7 in the App Store for months now and have basically turned the other cheek due to its whooping price tag of $12.99. I then also learned it had a Mac desktop companion which cost $24.99. So, I was looking at a suite of apps that costs $38.00. A bit expensive for my purposes which would be just a plain text / markdown editor. 

About 2 months or so ago, I wrote on article on note taking and how it has evolved for me. My final place I was at in that article was Notesy and nvALT. Unfortunately, I’ve been finding it hard to deal with Notesy and nvALT’s formatting of plain text. They work just like text/edit which is great, but also its downfall. There is no line spacing, bullets don’t format, and no syntax highlighting. I wanted something with formatting like Writer Pro or Ulysses which makes your plain text notes readable. However, Writer Pro and Ulysses were just not the right tools for note taking either as many people would probably agree. They were meant for long form writing.

So, I decided to explore Notebooks and pay the investment. So far, it has been almost everything I did want out of an app. There are a few things that aren’t cool which I will list below, but for the most part, its really quite good to use as a markdown/text editor to keep your notes.

Let’s start with the good things.

Nice Interface: The iOS app has a great interface (not so much on the desktop though). Formatting is really nice and finding notes is a breeze with its full text search.
Dropbox Sync: Like nvALT and Notesy, this will sync with a single Dropbox folder and pull in all your markdown or plain text notes that are completely searchable. Even if you create a note in another app and save it in that dropbox folder, it will still sync with notebooks.
Visual Syntax Highlighting: It’s nice to have syntax highlighting while taking notes. I love when I bold or italicize something in markdown and it visually makes the word or series of words bold or italic. The only problem is that it is faux syntax highlighting meaning that it doesn’t actually use the bold or italic version of your font, it just outlines or tilts the letters which is kind of a bummer because I love the fonts I use and would like to see the real ones used. On the upside, you don’t need to own every version of your favorite font to get visual syntax highlighting with this. BTW - I noticed MS Word for the iPad does this too, so I guess its not so uncommon.
Keyboard Shortcuts: I really love the keyboard shortcuts on the new Writer Pro for iPad and I wish every markdown app would have these, but they don’t. Notebooks comes pretty close with bold, italics, underline, and even a strikethrough keyboard shortcut. However, its missing important keyboard shortcuts for headings and links. I really miss the insert link keyboard shortcut on this, especially when it pastes the link automatically you have on your clipboard in and leaves at the area where you put the link text like Writer Pro does.
Any Font You Want: This is a big deal. I am able to choose from my library of fonts on iOS and install my own fonts using AnyFont which will appear in Notebooks. There is a very limited number of markdown apps that let you use your own font from the complete system library on iOS. Notesy certainly didn’t.
Formatting Customization: There is a wide variety of customizations as far as the interface. You can choose a background color, specify line spacing, and even choose a notebook like background image. I never liked these gimmicky background images because the text never aligns with the lines in the image correctly, but on Notebooks it does, so I actually really like using the gimmicky cheesy notebook background in this case.
Easy Markdown Preview: Another cool thing about Notebooks is that you can easily switch back and forth between note taking and markdown preview. Just tap the screen and you are back in preview and tap it again to see notes. When you are browsing through notes, the markdown preview is what you see, not the plain text. It’s very integrated on both desktop and iOS.
Any Style Sheet: The app comes with many style sheets to choose from, but you can also upload your own style sheet. I’ve chosen to use Brett Terpstra’s Swiss style sheet from Marked which is a plain and simple style sheet that is great for previewing and sending notes to a group.
Ok, now for the bad.

Desktop App Interface: Although it functionally works really well, the desktop app’s look is kind of old school. The biggest annoyance is the “switch to formatted view” button in the top right. It looks like it was just placed in there without any though. The app just doesn’t feel like a modern Mac app and it looks like it was rushed to the App Store. The good news is that it works great if you don’t mind getting your eyes a little sore from the interface.
Desktop Search Results: Another silly thing about the desktop, when you do a search, it pops up this weird popover that feels unnatural. It’s functional and works well, but just a bit out of the normal app context. The search box text field also looks awkward and out of place in the app.
First Line Choking: Like most modern note taking apps (where we just want to start typing), notebooks makes the first line of your note the filename. On the desktop though, it chokes while you type the first line because its also saving it as the filename I assume. It should just wait till you are finished. iOS doesn’t have this problem, but desktop certainly does.
Less Desktop Options: The desktop app has so many less features than it’s iOS counterpart. You can’t even specify line spacing on the desktop. This seems to be a first where a desktop app has less options than its iOS counterpart. It’s usually the other way around. However, iOS was built first and desktop was built after that due to a high demand for a desktop counterpart.
Overall, this is a great app and well worth the money. Stop investing in all these $5 note taking apps that do some of what you like, but not all of it. Just take the plunge on this one. 

My biggest criticism of Notebooks 7 is the desktop app. It really does need an update and hopefully one is coming soon for all of us who paid $25 for it. I just got a notice that they just released a Windows App for this (so that is what they have been working on all this time). Well, now that the Windows App is behind them, hopefully they can concentrate on the Mac App and make it better. It needs some help, especially because I paid $24.99 for it (plus App Store Taxes).

I do hope that Alfons Schmid continues to develop this and support this. It’s a great product with both an iOS and Mac app. So many independent developers fall off and stop supporting their products, but hopefully because we all paid a premium for this one, it will be enough to fund future versions of the app. I strongly believe in paying for apps that you use otherwise the developer has no reason to keep updating it and making it a better product. So, Alfons Schmid — Let’s do this.

Notebooks for Mac and iOS

Notebooks for iOS is a full fledged notebook offering plain text, rich text, drawings, and PDF storage. Like Evernote, it allows you to store quite a bit of information and easily sync it with the cloud (Dropbox). Unlike Evernote, its not nearly as robust in its features. I use it for plain text and markdown notes only and it seems excel at this. I’ll stick with Evernote for everything else.

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Omnifocus 2 for iPad

Omni Group has done it again. The new Omnifocus for iPad app is awesome. It’s almost just like its desktop counterpart except that it has a few more features that the desktop does not have including the ability to specify time when you enter a new task. I took a note of that and I’m hoping the desktop gets that one soon too. It’s a good sign its coming.

I love the new iOS 8 integrations so you can put a task in Omnifocus from anywhere that has a share bar. In addition, Omnifocus in the Today View is pretty awesome because you can easily check off recent tasks that were done without even having to unlock your iPad.

Most of the tasks that I need to do on a daily basis are given to me when I read my email. This is where I use my Omnifocus Mail Drop address a lot so that I don’t need to keep going back and forth between my mail and the Omnifocus app. Now, if we can only get that new sexy iOS 8 share button in our email programs to easily send a task to Omnifocus without opening Omnifocus. Email app developers such as Mail Pilot and Mailbox–do you hear me? I think I ought to develop an email program. Seems like the people who do these now have some good ideas, but if I was one of them–I would have had that feature out on Day 1 with iOS 8. Anyway, I’m going off topic.

Besides the awesome iOS 8 integrations, Omnifocus 2 for iPad carries over everything from version 1 that everybody loved wrapped in the new Omnifocus interface. This basically completes Omnifocus’s migration to the new interface. Omnifocus 1 for iPad was a big hit and Omni was smart to keep it the way it was. Sometimes its best not to fix something that is not broken.

At $29.99, it is expensive for an upgrade. However, the first Omnifocus for iPad was $39.99, so this one is a little bit less expensive. There is also a $19.99 in-app purchase for a pro upgrade that comes free if you purchased Omnifocus 1 for iPad. The pro upgrade is basically the same pro upgrade as the desktop—you get custom perspectives which is well worth the cost to me because that is how my entire Omnifocus is organized.

The Bushnell

I’m really happy to say that me and the team at Situation Interactive just launched The Bushnell’s new web site on Thursday.

The web site is over 120 pages or so being the large amount of information that The Bushnell needs to provide their stakeholders and patrons.  The most extensive part of the web site was the tickets section.  It used an API from Tickets.com to pull in data and then displayed that data on the front-end of our web site.  This provided a huge convenience to The Bushnell instead of having to manually type in links and performance dates for each date of a show with a long run like Wicked.

This was all done in Drupal with a few customizations such as the Tickets.com API being integrated.  We used these awesome slideshow modules from Mega Drupal that ended up working out really well although you had to figure out its quirks to get it work in older browsers such as IE 9.

Overall - this was a successful project from my point of view.  We launched on time and stayed within the client’s budget.

I’m looking forward to my next big thing.

The Bushnell

I’m really happy to say that me and the team at Situation Interactive just launched The Bushnell’s new web site on Thursday.

The web site is over 120 pages or so being the large amount of information that The Bushnell needs to provide their stakeholders and patrons. The most extensive part of the web site was the tickets section. It used an API from Tickets.com to pull in data and then displayed that data on the front-end of our web site. This provided a huge convenience to The Bushnell instead of having to manually type in links and performance dates for each date of a show with a long run like Wicked.

This was all done in Drupal with a few customizations such as the Tickets.com API being integrated. We used these awesome slideshow modules from Mega Drupal that ended up working out really well although you had to figure out its quirks to get it work in older browsers such as IE 9.

Overall - this was a successful project from my point of view. We launched on time and stayed within the client’s budget.

I’m looking forward to my next big thing.

iOS 8 Coming Out Today?

At this time last year, I was out to dinner with a few friends and one of us had just gotten iOS 7. The date was September 19th I believe.

Rumors have it here, here, and here that iOS 8 will hit our devices today at 1 PM.

I am so excited about this release as there are many awsome apps waiting on iOS 8 to be released including Ulysses for iOS, OmniFocus 2 for iPad, OmniGraffle 2 for iPad, Scrivener for iOS and many more. Can’t wait to see what the next month holds.

Amazon Music

Amazon Music was just released recently for anybody who is not aware. If you are an Amazon Prime customer already and also have Spotify, you may want to re-consider the $10 you pay for Spotify every month.

Amazon Music comes free with Prime in addition to 2 day shipping, a limited set of free Kindle books, and a free Netflix like service called Amazon Video. There are a plethora of apps for Amazon Music including iPhone, iPad, Mac, PC, Android, Samsung TV, Fire TV, and of course Kindle devices.

It’s not Spotify for sure and is missing quite a number of things that Spotify has, but for somebody like me, it’s good enough. I wouldn’t ditch Netflix for Amazon Prime video, but that’s because I can’t ditch Orange is the New Black and House of Cards or my Apple TV which doesn’t offer Amazon Prime Video.

iBank for Mac & iPad

I needed a new way to track my finances. I was using Mint for years and was pretty happy with the fact that it pulled in all my bank accounts automatically and it allowed me to categorize my transactions. The problem with Mint though is that I spent so much time categorizing and it was hard to project my income and expenses in the future. It would give me the past, but not the future. I also really disliked the way transfers were handled in Mint as it was a withdrawal from one account and a deposit in another which ended up inflating my income and spending reports.

So, the search began for a more sophisticated personal finance manager. I did some research and found that iBank 5 was the best thing to use on a Mac. However, it seemed that Quicken was still the gold standard, but only Quicken on a PC. The Mac version of Quicken was terrible and far behind iBank. So, I went with iBank since I am a Mac user. iBank did end up costing more than Quicken did when you add up the full suite of apps that they offer including $60 app for the desktop, $20 app for the iPad, and a $5 app for the iPhone. It also cost $40/year to use Direct Access which was offered through Quicken for free.

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Mail Pilot for Mac & iOS

Mail Pilot is the first mail app I’ve discovered in the app store that is GTD focused and has both a desktop and iOS application that works with the majority of my different kinds of email accounts including IMAP Exchange. While many of the other mail GTD iOS apps are excellent including Boxer, Cloud Magic and Mailbox, none of them offer a desktop companion for all types of accounts (including Exchange) yet. On the desktop, I’m using the built in Mail program along with Mail Act-On 3 to quickly get through my mail.

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Affordable Offsite Backup with Arq & Amazon Glacier

Let’s face it – in this day and age we all have valuable digital information that we are storing on our hard drives at home and probably using a Time Machine drive (or something similar) to backup our data in the event of a hard drive failure.

I have a great deal of photos, videos, web site code, and written work that I back up with a redundant drive at home whether it be my Time Machine drive or a redundant RAID array on my external drives.

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Adobe Sold Me.

Adobe has been sending me emails since Photoshop CC was released bugging me to buy a subscription for Photoshop CC and Lightroom 5. I must admit — $10/month is not a lot to pay for these 2 awesome photo editing apps, but I just don’t want to get stuck on a subscription. I also don’t want to get sucked into the $10/month introductory price and then have it be $20/month when my subscription renews after 12 months.

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